Useful Air Travel Holiday Tips

It is recommended to bring a lot of patience if you are going for a holiday trip. Patience is a must especially if you are flying to your destination. You also have to plan ahead in order to avoid delays and long security checkpoint lines.

These warnings are what you will hear from almost anyone who will know that you will be spending the holidays somewhere else than home. You should not ignore such things since they really can help you out in enjoying your entire vacation, from the planning, to the journey, to reaching to destination, to relaxing there and to your return trip back home.

1. Plan Ahead

The first thing that you should do is to plan ahead. Book your flight as early as you can; booking in a rush is never going to provide you with the cheapest airline tickets.

2. Be Security-ready

There is nothing more frustrating than being at the airport and having to go through your bag for your passport and plane tickets. It is highly recommended to have these documents handy at all time, especially when you are about to go through the security checkpoints. As soon as you are about to fall in line, be sure that your tickets, passport, boarding pass and picture IDs are in your hands.

3. Be ready for Inspection

Take off your jacket or coat and your bag should be ready for inspection. TSA checkpoint protocols necessitate flight passengers to take off outer clothing for X-ray before they can proceed to the metal detectors. In case you are only wearing a blazer with no inner shirt or blouse, you will not be obliged to remove that.

4. Get the Kids Ready for the Journey

If you are taking children with you, it would be best if you can talk to them before you start off, because they need to know how things go at the airport. This is very important especially if they will be flying for the first time. As much as possible, educated them on how to behave properly, especially during security checkpoints so that everything will go smoothly.

5. No Wrapping of Gifts

If you are bringing gifts for families and friends, keep them unwrapped. Wrapped items may have to be opened during security check, so you better just do the wrapping once you get to your destination.

6. Pack Lightly

As much as possible, check in baggage should be avoided and it would be best if you can fit all your essentials into your carry-on bag. That way you eliminate the risk of lost or delayed baggage.

7. Tag your Bag

If you really have to bring a lot of stuff and check in baggage cannot be avoided, you should make sure that your luggage is properly tagged with your address and phone number.

It will be to your best advantage if you can follow the tips mentioned above. It is better to come prepared than get stuck in the airport and have your holiday ruined.

Adventure Travel Holiday Ideas Like Paddling the Zambezi

Not all of us get the chance to have a real adventure, however these adventure travel holiday ideas can help you get closer to adventure.  And these aren’t just for the young, as baby boomers mature and find they’re still fit and have spare funds there are more such ideas tailored towards them as well.

An African Safari is a good start for adventure travel holiday ideas, especially one that starts in the South Luangwa National Park or the Kruger National Park and ends up with some time on a beach in Mauritius.  Flying over rugged and raw Damaraland, home to spectacular scenery, desert elephant and black rhinos is a kind of safari that deserves a mention in any list of vacation ideas. Combine this with a flying trip up the Skeleton Coast as far as Serra Cafeema and you will reach areas of utter Wilderness; areas that seem barren, yet captivate adventurous spirits.

For adventure travel holiday ideas with even more action try paddling the Zambezi: the Everest of rivers – but an Everest even first time paddlers can have a bash at (under good supervision.). It’s a big volume, big white water river trip with waves up to 24ft (which you’re tackling in a 16ft raft.) and the added bonus being surrounded by astounding African scenery, meeting some of the more exotic locals and the comfort of sunshine and warm water (around 24 degrees.).   Paddling Uganda’s White Nile, Nepal’s Sun Kosi or Chile’s Futaleufu River are similar, just with different, but equally adventurous backdrops.

Why opt for the Everest of rivers if there are also adventure travel holiday ideas that allow you to tackle the Everest that is Everest?  Trekking to Everest Base Camp is manageable for most people, after the correct training and preparation. Kilimanjaro is another good challenge for adventurous people, as is the Paine Circuit, The Great Walk of Africa or even the Mont Blanc Circuit – for starters.

For more exotic adventure travel holiday ideas – the kinds of things your friends may never even heard of, let alone attempted, consider Paragliding around Oludeniz, Bungee jumping off Verzasca Dam ah la James Bond, camping with Saharan Nomads, swimming with Bull Sharks at Protea Banks or Cave Diving under the Nullarbor Plain.

Adventure travel holiday ideas for people looking to pick up and dash off without training include padding between the Lofoten Islands, walking between the picturesque villages of the Pyrenees or exploring some of Scotland’s Knoydart Peninsula.  Just start by looking at extreme activities available for holidaying people – like Heli-biking in the Tien Shan, and work your way down until you find a truly adventurous holiday activity in the same vein, but less likely to see you bursting one without the proper preparation!

Travel & Holiday Books

Travel Writing
When it comes to travel writing, the literature can narrate the writer’s experiences that occur during those travels, the people the writer meets and the ambience and aesthetic appeals the writer may be experiencing – these all go into a travelogue. It is fair to say that a travelogue tends to be more directly allied with literature about al fresco events than about proceedings taking place within the boundaries of buildings of one sort or another.

A prime example of this kind of travel writing is ‘Just a Little Run Around the World’ by Rosie Swale Pope. Adventure World Magazine records that, during her travels, Rosie’s trip took her five years during which she encountered three packs of wolves, and wore out 53 pairs of shoes – to paraphrase the sub-title of her book: “….5 Years, 3 Packs of Wolves and 53 Pairs of Shoes”. During this sojourn she also accumulated 29 proposals of marriage, had a brush with frost bite and got hit by a bus! She also got chased by a man in his birthday suit, brandishing a gun! Why did she undertake this mammoth odyssey? You’ll have to read the book to find out – turn to our Travel and Holiday section where you will find the story of this woman’s amazing travels listed, along with a diversity of other titles.

Would you Put this into the Travel Category?
As with any other genre, the travel and holiday category does not stand alone, but rubs shoulders with essay writing such as a writer’s observations on the peoples of a specific nation. An excellent example of this sub-genre would be Kate Fox’ “Watching the English: The Hidden Rules of English Behaviour”. It is an intensely amusing observation of the detailed behaviour that is inherently English.

Personally, I dislike this particular treatise because I find it over-generalised with references to the English when it might be better to refer to those people as British. Kate Fox focuses on her observances of English behaviour and practices which, admittedly are often totally alien to people from other nationalities: however, her treatise would have been more balanced had she entitled her book “Watching the British: The Hidden Rules of Regional British”. Why have I made this comment? If you are Welsh, Scottish or Irish, you will know exactly what I am talking about.

Countries and Regions
Foreigners tend to make this over-generalisation that, if they say ‘English’ it’s a catch-all word covering with whole of the British Isles. Truth be told, nothing could be further from the truth: Kate Fox fails to make any distinction between the individual identities of the countries and regions that make up the British Isles – all of which have distinct and regional differentiations that have absolutely no reference to the comments Kate Fox is making in her book. Added to that, lumping English people together when the people of Cornwall, as a prime example, consider themselves completely unique to the rest of England – as do the people in the North of England – is a vast over-generalisation and could well continue to perpetuate the myth amongst foreigners that England constitutes the whole of the United Kingdom when, in fact, the English are just one nationality amongst their regional cousins, all of whom are governed separately and independently for the most part and whose peoples are totally and completely different to the ideal and popular perception of the English.

Guidebook Series
Volume sales of travel and holiday guidebooks in general have seen a slump of 4.8% in 2008 according to Stanfords, a bookshop in London. Those guidebooks that specialise in advising visitors where to eat and drink and where to stay has really taken a knock: this sub-genre has lost 20.9% in sales value over the past year. It would be interesting to hear what readers of this site think – what do you attribute to this loss in sales of the ubiquitous guidebook series? Write in and tell us what you think.

One of my all-time favourites when it comes to travel and holiday writing, is Karl Pilkington. At present he is a little-known author, having only written two books – both of which you will find amongst our travel and holiday pages, under the section marked ‘General AAS’. While both his books make excellent reading, the book I am specifically referring to here is “Happyslapped by a Jellyfish”. The title says it all! Pilkington describes this book as a travel guide although, equably it could fit just as easily into the autobiography genre – as well as various other sub-genres as well. The book is humorous and witty – and I am not going to say any more about it. If you want to read it [and you should] you need to pop it into your basket and head for our checkout. This book is remarkably cheaper here than in many other places so, apart from being a good read that will make you laugh, it is good value as well.

Atlases & Maps
Satnav sales may be increasing but, is there a corresponding plummet in the sales of atlases and maps? Overall, figures taken from Nielsen BookScan reveal that the travel genre overall saw a fall of 8.7% on the total sales from the previous year. The year 2008 saw sales of atlases and maps down by 19.6% in value – a factor that retailers are attributing to internet route-finders and satellite navigation increasing in popularity.

Tourism & Leisure Studies
One thing you probably wouldn’t think of in relation to tourism and leisure is the impact of politics associated with leisure pursuits. This is a factor focused on by the Nijmegen University in The Netherlands, with their research centred on the close proximity between tourism and leisure, geographic perspectives and the impacts on these pursuits by social and planning activities. Their studies centre on the link between man and his environment and between concepts of space-time together with supply and demand, all of which culminates in burgeoning political interest in tourism and leisure as an industry.

Basically, in a nutshell, the impact that tourism and the need for leisure facilities have on the environment in which people live has a direct effect on planning issues and the economics of the country involved. While this research was carried out in The Netherlands, this is true of any country which depends on tourism as a major source of their economy, affecting everything from planning regulations to the development of their infrastructure to take into account huge influxes of tourists during the strategic months. The principles and practice of tourism and leisure studies form the basis of the book “Leisure and Recreation Management” written by Dr George Torkildsen who has been instrumental in teaching, management and writing about the leisure industry and tourism management generally for the whole of his career.

Planning The Perfect Travel Holiday

The first thing you must do before deciding on a location to go to on your holiday is the amount of money that you are willing to spend. It’s not just the travel expenses that have to be accounted for but also the food, accommodation, sightseeing, recreation and miscellaneous expenses have to be accounted for as well. The more money that you are willing to spend, the better your holiday will be. You must set yourself a budget otherwise you may end up having financial problems which will cause your travel holiday to become not as enjoyable as you hoped for. Always keep a little bit over your budget (around $100 to $200), just in case you need it.

Once you have set yourself a budget, the next thing you should do is decide on the type of activities that you are looking forward to doing. You may want to go cave exploring or you may want to go bungee jumping for example. This foundation decision will affect where you end up going for your travel holiday. If you are not going alone on a travel holiday, it is always a good idea to take the opinion of the people that are going with you so that they do not feel left out and end up not enjoying themselves. This way, you get more ideas on the activities that you may want to do.

Once you have decided on the first to decisions, it is time to actually decide where you want to go. When going for a holiday, always remember to go somewhere exotic so that you can get a taste of different cultures. Always keep in mind that your decision as to where to go for your holiday must depend on the budget that you have along with the type of activities that you wish to do.

By following this simple and straight-forward guide, you will be able to plan the perfect travel holiday in no time and with minimal expenses and waste of time.

Travelling Holidays For Seniors

If you are a senior in search of a vacation, planning ahead could ensure you of a memorable and fun trip. Various types of vacations can be planned around senior travel, and whether you are looking to relax or plan your holiday full of activity, your convenience and any special attention you might require should be taken into consideration.

Taking a cruise no longer means sailing with young spring breakers looking for a 24-hour party. Certain voyages offer five-star treatment on a smaller scale, making manoeuvring about the ship an easier task, which is what many seniors require. The smaller, more intimate crowd offers a quieter trip, making relaxing conversation and new friendships possible. Most large cruise lines offer Alaskan cruises or South Seas cruises with ports-of-call geared with seniors in mind. You might even want to plan an around-the-world vacation on the world’s largest vessels that offer every amenity a senior could need.

If sailing the seas is not your chosen destination, you might consider a river cruise on some of America’s great rivers. The Mississippi River is popular to small cruise boats and paddlewheelers that offer cruises up to a week long. These senior cruises many times offer some type of on-board lecturers and history and educational cruises to peak the interest of senior travellers while they move lazily down the river. Several historical ports-of-call offer day adventures along the way in order to see the sights of each city.

If travelling by land suits you more, consider a senior tour. Many travel companies offer exceptional travel plans for the senior by offering unique railroad trips, hot air ballooning or private jet or plane tours with specific stops. Whatever your choice, planning details well ahead of your travel dates will ensure a successful trip. Agents and tour companies offer different types of senior tours, because seniors usually have varied preferences when it comes to group size. A large group of seniors will often take coach holidays which usually holds 40 people, with an escort. A great advantage to a senior tour is that sightseeing, lodging, and most of the dining arrangements are typically planned for you in advance.

If you are an active senior adult, you might want to plan a vacation geared around physical activity. While this type of vacation may not fall within the definition of typical senior travel, they are popular with many seniors well into their 70’s and 80’s. These types of tours could include extensive walking, hiking, or cycling. Your accommodations can be more rustic and the tour areas more remote if you choose. Sailing may also be included.

You can also plan your trip around your middle-aged children with a type of family reunion at a specific destination. Motor home vacations are popular with seniors, and your travel agent can assist you in planning a vacation that includes a motor home rental. There are motor home parks scattered across the country offering breathtaking sights and some great memories.